Attentive Behaviors Part 2

Attention is the act of concentrating on one or more aspects of an environmental task that requires the ability to multi-task sensory  processing input.   Sensory influences in the environment for each of our sensory systems contribute to attention.  These influences can be easily tweaked to improve attentive behaviors. For example:  


Attentive Behaviors Part 1

Attention is the act of concentrating on one or more aspects of an environmental task that requires the ability to multi-task sensory  processing input.   Types Of Attention   Children who have sensory processing disorders often have deficits with attending behaviors as well. As caregivers, we all primarily tend to wish for sustained,   focused on task behavior during  self-care, school, and play. However, there

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Why set up a workstation for Duplo projects?

In much the same way as a mechanic, scrapbook pro, or programmer  would set up a tool chest separating out tools that perform different functions, children with SPD also need to learn to associate form with function.  One technical term used is the phrase “identification of functional affordances” (what function can this object afford me?).  The ability to quickly identify how an object can

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Setting up Fine Motor Skills

Many children who have Sensory Processing Disorders, also have deficits in prerequisites for efficient emergence of fine motor skills: Executive Functions Attention Task organization Task maintenance behaviors / sustaining focus Initiating/terminating activities Postural control coordinating muscles that control posture Ocular motor control coordinating muscles that control the eye balls Developmental Prehension Coordinating muscles that control hand and finger moves Getting all of these domains

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We hung up a hammock

The fabric of the hammock was silky and didn’t cling to the skin like the Lycra swing.  So we didn’t use it primarily to enhance body awareness  in the same way we used the Lycra swing.  Instead, we found ourselves using it for pushing and pulling, climbing and rolling movement patterns. These coordinated types of movement patterns are the same ones  required for daily

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Graviception

Graviception is described as the ability to appreciate the force of gravity as we move through space.  Graviception develops from integration of sensory input including information  from the vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems.  Research has now shown that graviception provides a developmental basis for evolving concepts of spatial relations embedded in academic success.  Curricular skills such as handwriting, math, geometry, history, geography, and fluency

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Giant Slot Builders

When presented with a child who has weak  “upper body strength” (generally meaning low tone throughout, including  poor postural control, slushy or dysarthric speech, poor ocular motility/ visual search patterns, and poor spatial orientation), the need to follow a developmental frame of reference comes into view.  While engaging the interest and intellect of the child is a key part of intervention, use of strategies

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Awareness of the Self in Space

Our knowledge about concepts such as body scheme, personal space, and near space perception has grown tremendously over the recent  years.  This has largely been due to a broad array of neurophysiological, neurokinesiological, and neuropsychological research evidence.  Bringing these concepts down to the practical level of function and intervention for the child with SPD can be daunting. However, given advances in fmri and DTI

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Oversized Manipulatives

For youngsters with sensory processing disorders, use of oversized manipulatives necessitates use of an additional layer of cognitive control. Rather than just taking a quick glance at the picture, and moving into action, completion of this task will require interaction among multiple sensory systems. This series shows an activity Integrating vision with touch, movement and language.  Learning goals achieved through multisensory input include, but

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Visual Motor Integration Basics

Parents may want to know that  there is a developmental sequence for introducing visual motor integration basics to children who have deficits in this area. The sequence begins with having a steady base of support that acts upon a stationary target.  (i.e. an infant holding onto a bottle with both hands while sucking).  The progression develops so that the child can reach for moving

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