Category Archives: Vision

Functional Vision: Beyond 20/20

Functional vision behavior includes more than 20/20 vision.  While use of vision for reading and handwriting or keyboarding are very important, use of the eyes for self care, guiding motor moves for coordination, identifying objects in the environment and determining  how they are used, are crucial for success with  independent living skills. Functional vision behavior can be strengthened through “play”,  by tapping into the

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Fine Motor Skills Part 2

The Visual Component The ability to use vision to guide the sequencing of  motor output is a defining point in the development of fine motor competency. Acquisition of this skill allows for use of tools for self care, including utensils as well as grooming aids such as combs for hair care and razors for shaving. A growing child will also need to learn to

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Capturing Attention

Heavy work activities are often used to improve postural control and upper body stability.   The heavy work helps to modulate attention and to prepare the upper body to support follow up fine motor skills.  However, physioball walk outs  and other resistive activities commonly used for heavy work can easily become routine, resulting in decreased attention to task and postural control. We found a discounted

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Visual Sequencing Skills: Following step-by-step instructions

Visual sequencing essentially incorporates the use of language skills as you talk yourself through a task.  However the activity presented to this youngster incorporates a wealth of additional learning skills. Visual Sequencing involves use of the concept “what comes next?”  This is a vital reading readiness skill  in that the youngster is required to mentally organize a series of  visual images/letters along with their

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Back to School with Sustained Visual Regard!

Getting youngsters with Sensory Processing Disorders to sustain visual attention and visual pursuits as needed for greater success in reading and exploring the environment can be problematic. Without sustained visual attention, the ability to name  and understand the functionality of whatever it is you are looking at, is difficult.  Without the ability to sustain looking for visual pursuit of the object as it  moves,

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Back to School with Visual Association Skills

Many children who have Sensory Processing Dysfunction (SPD)  also have difficulty with Visual Association skills  (the ability to connect language with visual images).  Research using Diffusion tensor Imaging shows us that this may be due to poor connectivity of  brain pathways responsible for linking the visual cortex with the language cortex of the brain. Fortunately, when children are young and the cortex of the

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Postural Control and Vision

As a sensory modality,  vision tends to guide many of our motor moves.  Vision is designed to work with  balance, control of posture, language, motor skills  and intellectual development. For example, a baby learns early on  how to  use vision for  guiding muscles of the neck and mouth toward a nipple for food and comfort.  Later on, the infant will learn how to use

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Integrating Body Awareness with Vision

The ability to maintain body orientation and posture in relation to the surrounding environment (physical and social space) is challenging for many children.  Mastering these skills represents a point of entry for most group and sports activities.  These sorts of activities tend to lead  to friendships and improved sense of self worth.  For children with sensory processing dysfunction, this point of integration represents a challenge that

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An Introduction to Visual Processing Skills

Visual processing skills enable learning and generally include skills that are carried out through use of the muscles that surround each eyeball.  Since children who have SPD tend to have deficits with coordinating their muscles, these small muscles that are hidden within the orbit of the eyeball are generally also impacted. Visual processing includes both “motor free” skills such as visual discrimination as well

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Whole Part Relationships

Using construction puzzles to introduce whole-part relationships   When we first started this activity, the parts of the animals were assembled in total disarray.  While the child was able to match the colors, the sizes of the pieces were not in order to show that the dinosaur had an arch to his back, the legs of the alligator were assembled upside down, and the

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