Category Archives: sensory processing

Encouraging Development of Fine Motor Skills

There are many reasons why fine motor skills fail to develop as planned. Therefore, from time to time, specific types of fine motor skills may need prompts to emerge.  This blog will discuss activities parents and teachers can use to encourage the development of different aspects of fine motor skills.  These aspects include sustained attention, eye movements, hand movements and the ability to put

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Spatial Orientation – Part 3

Impacting Classroom Skills Spatial orientation may be defined as the ability to maintain the  posture of the body as  it relates to the surrounding space.  Whether the body is at rest or moving, children need to be aware of how they are positioned in the space around them.  For example, in order to be safe while moving around in a playground,  a child needs

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Tactile Perception

Tactile Perception refers to the ability to match an object being touched with an idea of what the object is and how it is to  be used or handled. This ability  allows us to handle objects such as touch screens, buttons, zippers, pocket change, and even fragile objects  without fumbling, even though we can’t necessarily see all the parts of the items as we

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Spatial Orientation

From Handwriting to Geometry The term “spatial orientation” refers to use of vision when comparing the way in which things are turned and rotated. In terms of daily living skills, spatial orientation is the knack of being aware of how objects are turned and how they fit together.  For example, in the home this skill helps children learn which foot fits into a sneaker,

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Upper Body Strength

Increases independence in self care at home and fine motor success at school Low muscle tone, and poor coordination tend to be a problem for many children who have Sensory Processing Dysfunction and may result in weak upper body strength.  This impacts the muscles of the neck needed to hold the head in a centered position so that the eye muscles can work properly. 

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Understanding Directions

Navigational skills – being able to sequentially follow directions does not come easily for persons with Sensory Processing Dysfunction.   While many might consider this skill to be somewhat intuitive, developmental theorists have shown us that this skill  initially develops in childhood from learning experiences we have with manipulating objects in space. It is from this basic platform of building and constructing projects that the

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Back to School with Visual Association Skills

Many children who have Sensory Processing Dysfunction (SPD)  also have difficulty with Visual Association skills  (the ability to connect language with visual images).  Research using Diffusion tensor Imaging shows us that this may be due to poor connectivity of  brain pathways responsible for linking the visual cortex with the language cortex of the brain. Fortunately, when children are young and the cortex of the

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Body Awareness A.K.A. Somatosensory Perception

What is Body Awareness and how does it work? Body awareness is the ability to interpret sensory information arising from joints, muscles, skin and inner ears of the body. These specialized sensory receptors are termed “somatosensory receptors”. They function by relying upon a multitude of moment to moment reactions incorporating concepts of how the body is situated  in space, how the body parts are positioned,

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Vestibular Functions And SPD Part 3

One outcome of vestibular functions is spatial awareness. This skill may be defined as the ability to perceive the shape and position of objects in the environment and/or  the ability to appreciate the position of oneself in relationship to objects in the environment. The vestibular system stimulates the muscles of the eyes and ears so as to sharpen their ability to discriminate among sensory

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Vestibular Processing and SPD Part 2

Essential  Skills  Mediated by the Vestibular System Visual system – coordination of muscles that move the eye balls.  This helps eyes work together to focus on:  a) the trajectory of moving objects as they pass through space and b) the perceived trajectory of stationary objects in the environment as the person moves from place to place. Auditory system – coordination of muscles that act

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