Category Archives: fine motor skills

Postural Control and Fine Motor Skills

Direct links exist between postural control and fine motor skills due to neuromotor pathways  that activate when heavy work is used.  The links include attention and control of movement for the muscles that move the eyes (i.e. reading) and those that move the hands (i.e. writing or keyboarding).   Postural control is an essential ingredient needed for successful  eye hand coordination skills.  When the

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Fine Motor Skills Part 2

The Visual Component The ability to use vision to guide the sequencing of  motor output is a defining point in the development of fine motor competency. Acquisition of this skill allows for use of tools for self care, including utensils as well as grooming aids such as combs for hair care and razors for shaving. A growing child will also need to learn to

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Fine Motor Skills Part 1

The Motor Component combines visual guidance with hand function skills Fine motor skills develop throughout infancy and continue to develop through the teen years.  Initial developmental skills with hand function are directed toward success with: simple grasp patterns the ability to separate fingers for object manipulation the ability to use both hands together During the preschool years, grasp patterns mature to include recruiting vision

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Impacting Your Environment? Fingers Please!

In part, because the fingers are situated away from the center of the body, and they require more brain power to access, coordinated improvement of finger patterns are among the latest to develop during childhood. Infants are born with grasp pattern reflexes that allow them to hold objects early in development.  However, integrated patterns of touch sensations followed by motor expression begin to take

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Strengthening Fine Motor Skills

Using food crafts to help develop precision in fine motor skills The skills needed to coordinate small muscles of the body, such as the muscles of the fingers, eyes, and ears take the longest time to mature.  Synchronization of these smallest muscles requires sustained attention, along with the ability to remember little details about the actions of these muscles.  The ability to pull together

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Attention! Welcome Fingertips!

(Try  dressing, eating, or washing up without them) Most of the children I have treated over the years who have  had coordination deficits generally tended to have difficulty using hand and finger motions as well.  These difficulties often caused problems with daily living activities such as dressing, manipulating clothing fasteners (buttons, zippers, shoe laces, etc.),  using utensils,  grooming and hygiene. Planning developmentally appropriate projects

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Fingertip Prehension Patterns

Fingertip prehension patterns begin early on in life, but are some of the last motor functions to mature completely.  In some part, this is because such a large part of the motor region in the brain is dedicated to coordinating movements of the hand. This means that it takes more focused attention and mental effort to move the hand and fingers, than it does

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